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The Accessible Virtual Campus

Texts

Illustration of a stack of generic textbooks represents Text Section.

Beyond electronic versions of textbooks.  If the books you are using are not available electronically, what obstacles might your students with disabilities run into? Be pro-active.

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In-line EqTD AUDIT

This is the AUDIT to use to evaluate the accessibility of in-line text characters that need to be treated as graphic elements for accessibility e.g. subscript, ampersand, foreign letters.

R2D2 Center at UW-Milwaukee

In-line EqTD AUDIT  (Excel Document)

In-line EqTD AUDIT Manual (Version 1.3)  (PDF File)

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Accessible Documents Using Styles

This PDF contains a quick and easy overview on how the "styles" feature enables the design of accessible documents, as well as organized and structured documents.

R2D2 Center at UW-Milwaukee

Accessible Documents Using Styles  (PDF File)

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EqTD AUDIT

Use this AUDIT to evaluate the accessibility and usability of non-text graphics in a variety of media.

R2D2 Center at UW-Milwaukee

EqTD AUDIT  (Excel Document)

EqTD Manual  (PDF File)

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Writing Equivalent Text Descriptions (EqTDs) Posterette

This short 2-page document provides the essential "bare-bones" of what needs to be included in an equivalent text description (EqTD) and where the EqTD should be placed in a document. Whenever you create a document, whether it is electronic or paper, any non-text based element (e.g., picture, graph, "eye-candy") is not accessible to many individuals, so EqTDs should be provided.

R2D2 Center at UW-Milwaukee

Writing EqTD's Posterette  (PDF File)

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Accessibility Guides

This link explains general accessibility guidelines. "Not sure how to convert a Microsoft Word document into an accessible format? Confused as how to create a tagged document in Adobe Acrobat? The Accessibility Guides provided by CTFD are here to help you convert and create your course materials into accessible formats."

The Center for Teaching and Faculty Development, San Francisco State University

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Accessible Data Tables

This article by Roger Hudson explains how to present data in an accessible table. He includes how to design the table, how to make it friendly to a screen reader, how to create both complex and simple tables, how to test the tables accessibility, and much more.

"Web Usability"

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Accessible Tables

This webpage discusses the complexities of tables and how to make them accessible.

Jim Thatcher

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Accessible Word: Tables

This website provides a brief tip sheet about making Microsoft tables accessible. A nice diagram accompanies the discussion about how screenreaders read tables.

NC State University

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Clear Print Guidelines

This website provides information on a UK site "supporting blind and partially sighted people" by preparing accessible print documents.

Royal National Institute of Blind People, UK

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Color

This website is everything you would want to know about color and accessibility. While this page was prepared for web accessibility, these issues also are relevant for print, poster, Power Point, etc. materials.

University of Minnesota Duluth

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Creating Accessible Forms - General Form Accessibility

"When we talk about the accessibility of forms, we are usually referring to their accessibility to people who use screen readers. People with other types of disabilities are generally less affected by faulty forms. It should be noted, however, that everyone benefits from a well-organized, highly usable form, especially those with cognitive disabilities." This website contains comprehensive how-tos.

Web Accessibility in Mind

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Design Tips for Designing Text

This website provides information about the usability of websites. It discusses in detail the importance of text styles for people with and without disabilities. How text styles impact screen readers is discussed, but also, "People (generally) read most easily when the appearance of the text they are reading has some familiarity." Discussion relates to font selection, size, alignment, and layout.

Thomas Brunt's OutFront

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E-Books for Education? Not so Fast...

This E-Book Market Brief highlights some of the problems with accessibility of media in the commercial and open education resource markets. The problem extends to purchasing decisions for hardware, software, e-learning platforms, apps, and more.

National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM Center)

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Effective Color Contrast

This web page includes 3 general guidelines for making effective color choices that work for everyone when designing.

Lighthouse International

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Effective Practices for Description of Science Content within Digital Talking Book Project

"This project is researching and documenting effective practices for providing meaningful descriptions of science content within Digital Talking Books that serve post-secondary students, professionals and scientists who have visual impairments or blindness. A particular focus is ways to describe non-text content, such as equations, charts, and diagrams." [Annotation from CATEA resource page]

National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM)

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Fonts and Accessibility

This webpage discusses which fonts are the most readable and which are the most appropriate for web use. The different "font families" are compared and contrasted.

WebAIM

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Making Text Legible  (Research based)

The Arlene R. Gordon Research Institute of Lighthouse International has carried out a set of studies examining the role of several factors in reading and text legibility. The results of multiple studies are presented in short paragraphs. A list of additional readings are also included.

Lighthouse International

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Online Course on Multiple Formats

Industry Canada presents this tutorial to learn the WHY and basic How-to's of multiple formats. It includes formats such as braille, large print, and described video.

National Library of Canada

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THE BLIND READERS' PAGE - Sources for Online Books

This is a list of online sources for electronic books, magazines, newspaper articles, and other material. The files are in a variety of formats ranging from plain text to digital audio and digital braille. Most material is public domain literature and free of charge, although some do charge a subscription fee for content and/or proprietary software.

THE BLIND READERS' PAGE

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The PALM Initiative - Purchase Accessible Learning Materials

"As classrooms start to incorporate more digital technology, it becomes increasingly important that materials used in the classroom are designed to be useable by all students from the start. This requires adjustments in the way materials are purchased, and that, in turn, will drive the availability of more flexible and accessible learning materials in the marketplace." The PALM Initiative (Purchase Accessible Learning Materials) offers a Tool Kit and other valuable resources that identify the problem and offer suggestions for impacting publishers regarding accessibility of instructional media.

National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM Center)

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What are Alternative Formats? How Do They Apply to Programs and Services?

This article from Access Today explains what alternative formats are, why it is important to implement them, and how to do this. This article also addresses the legal obligations individuals have to provide alternate formats.

The National Center on Accessibility-Indiana University

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"When I had my accident I was told that, if I were to live, I'd live in an institution for the rest of my life... I don't think those people thought that that institution would be the Parliament of Canada"

Steven Fletcher, Member of Canadian Parliament