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The Accessible Virtual Campus

Labs and Studios

Illustration of a microscope and a flask represents the Lab section of website.
There needs to be room to move, everyone needs to be able to reach and see and do. Check out these recommendations.
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Computer Labs

This website provides general guidelines to survey the physical accessibility of a computer lab. Some examples of guidelines are physical space, printed materials, and electronic resources.

Washington University DO-IT

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Computer Workstations (Computer Access Series)

This webpage includes an "AT Quick Reference" guide to help individuals make their computer workstations more accessible. There are also answers to frequently asked questions regarding accessible computer workstations.

Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access (CATEA)

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Lab Work Guide UID

This webpage includes the top 10 tips for making laboratory materials and activities universally designed. Some examples for lab work are included.

University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

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Rubric for Evaluating Universal Design of Syllabus

This printable rubric provides a guide to evaluate a syllabus based on different elements using universal design components.

EnACT, California State University

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Science Labs

This website provides disability specific accommodations for lab environments to increase accessibility for all people, including people with disabilities.

DO-IT, University of Washington

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Universal Design of Computer Labs

Detailed checklists for planning and developing universally designed computer laboratories.

Burgstahler, S. DO-IT, University of Washington

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It took me several years of struggling with the heavy door to my building, sometimes having to wait until a person stronger came along, to realize that the door was an accessibility problem, not only for me, but for others as well. And I did not notice, until one of my students pointed it out, that the lack of signs that could be read from a distance at my university forced people with mobility impairments to expend a lot of energy unnecessarily, searching for rooms and offices. Although I have encountered this difficulty myself on days when walking was exhausting to me, I interpreted it, automatically, as a problem arising from my illness (as I did with the door), rather than as a problem arising from the built environment having been created for too narrow a range of people and situations.

Susan Wendell, author of
The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability