Please log in to rate and comment on entries or to edit your profile.

Know a good UDE website or resource?

Submit a link.

Learn About
Universal
Design in
Education

This section of the website serves as an introductory window into information about Universal Design in Education. As is explained in a bit more detail below, this is a broad scope. Success in higher education is not dependent on only curriculum and instruction, but depends on access to the physical environment as well as the electronic and information environments.

This portion of the website also explains about the terminology we use. We have carefully selected UDE as opposed to other terms such as UDL or UDI to reflect the scope of UD applications applied in postsecondary education.

internal link

An Introduction to Universal Design in Higher Education

This presentation by Roger O. Smith, PhD, OT, FAOTA, to a group of faculty at University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse includes an overview of Universal Design in Higher Education (UDE). This is the first video in a series of 4 and coverse the current system of individual accommodations and the A3 Model, a theoretical model of how campuses serve the needs of students with disabilities. The question, “Why universal design in education?” is answered with historical context and perspectives from current research.

R2D2 Center at UW-Milwaukee

1 of 4 (captioned) An Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

1 of 4 (video described) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

2 of 4 (captioned) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

2 of 4 (video described) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

3 of 4 (captioned) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

3 of 4 (video described) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

4 of 4 (captioned) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

4 of 4 (vid. described) Introduction to UD in Higher Education  YouTube Video

Not yet rated

It took me several years of struggling with the heavy door to my building, sometimes having to wait until a person stronger came along, to realize that the door was an accessibility problem, not only for me, but for others as well. And I did not notice, until one of my students pointed it out, that the lack of signs that could be read from a distance at my university forced people with mobility impairments to expend a lot of energy unnecessarily, searching for rooms and offices. Although I have encountered this difficulty myself on days when walking was exhausting to me, I interpreted it, automatically, as a problem arising from my illness (as I did with the door), rather than as a problem arising from the built environment having been created for too narrow a range of people and situations.

Susan Wendell, author of
The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability